DNA Testing – Part 2

March 1, 2015 at 11:46 pm | Posted in uncategorized | Leave a comment

In the first part of this series, I talked about personal DNA testing and the available options. I ended up choosing 23andMe to include the health markers.

It’s worth noting that humans are 99% the same genetically. What the tests look at is parts of the 1% of genes that vary person-to-person. The different organizations vary on the focus of the genes they read. 23andMe looks more at health while FTDNA more at the family tree, as per their name.

The process is straightforward. As noted, you buy a test kit and they mail it to you. You take the simple sample and register the kit to yourself on their web site. And you mail it back in, prepaid. They let me know when it is received by the actual lab. (from Canada, they appear to gather the samples and batch ship them across the border) 4-6 weeks later, you get notified of the results on-line. And there is quite a bit of info.

This includes detail on quite a few areas. There’s your Maternal and Paternal (if you’re a male) lines (Haplotypes), genetic risk factors, drug response, inherited conditions, and traits. There is general ancestry info and and some ancestry composition. I was amused to see a connection with Doggerland, a now-submerged area that once connected France and England.

They accurately named eye colour, hair colour, blood type, and more. Birth weight range was wrong. I saved over 2 dozen reports. Even got to download the “music” of my DNA. Keep in mind that much of this is still quite early on but is growing rapidly.

They also have some experimental tools for exploring health and ancestry in various ways, like comparing your DNA to someone you’ve agreed to connect with. Once you’re in the system, information will be updated as new studies are integrated.

There are also various quizzes to help add support the research. And permission requests to share your DNA anonymously with researchers. You have control how much sharing is done at all points and can change your mind. And you choose if you want to even see some of the heath reports.

Because close relatives had already done the test, I didn’t expect surprises and there were none. Pretty generic average health stuff which I realized was a very good thing. Hardy stock, as they say, that was “successful”.

In my case, I elected to connect with genetic relatives, which includes the ones I know who have tested. And they show up in the system so you can invite them, connection by connection, to compare where you’re in common. This is quite distinct even from sibling to sibling. There was a small number of close relatives, some I don’t know, then hundreds of 4th and further cousins.

I’ve also uploaded my DNA to another system and will have those results in a couple of weeks. FTDNA can’t take the new V4 chip version of 23andMe but can accept older V3 results. I plan to research several other sites mentioned in the first article and may do a follow-up article here after more of this is digested.

It’s a fascinating exploration. And the more people that test, the more results they’ll have and the more research is supported.

Meanwhile here’s an interesting story where DNA results revealed that siblings were not related to the rest of their family. Turns out, their father had been switched at birth.
David

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