CHIPping Away

May 25, 2015 at 3:11 pm | Posted in uncategorized | Leave a comment

I wrote previously about CHIP (Complete Health Improvement Program) and some of the science behind CHIP. I also wrote a related article on Minimizing Cancer Risk, basically with much the same recommendations.

The first articles were written early on in the course. As the course has progressed, we’ve gone into much more detail on various things, like the value of fibre and micronutrients vs calorie-dense foods. We’ve explored the major effect lifestyle has on issues like heart disease, diabetes and cancer plus cleared up some nutritional myths about protein, calcium, iron and vitamins.

If we look at the bigger picture of our health and well-being, it works out that about 70% of it is determined by our lifestyle choices. In other words, the bulk of our health is in our hands.

Another 10% is influenced by our genetics. But more important than our genes is gene expression. The study of gene expression is known as epigenetics. Just because we have a gene doesn’t mean it will be expressed.

For example, every cell has the entire set of genes. But an ear cell doesn’t need to express any of the genes that create proteins specific to brains, gut or eyes. Those genes are turned off. And the largest influence on gene expression? Nutrition.

Makes sense if you consider that our diet is what gives the body both it’s building blocks and many of the challenges it has to deal with. Change the gene expression and it changes your body. This is why even identical twins get increasingly different over their lives – small differences is choices. They add up. And you have a choice.

Sometimes you see diseases that are “passed down” in families. We may blame genetics but what is something else we pass down? Lifestyles, including diet and activity levels. These typically have a stronger effect on our life than our genes themselves do. In other words, it’s not so much what we have but how we use it.

We also explored how beliefs drive feelings and feelings drive behaviour. Becoming conscious of some of our old beliefs around food and exercise can be very useful. Say for example, “I hate broccoli”. I certainly once felt this way. But finally as an adult I discovered that I don’t actually, especially if it’s served with a squeeze of lemon.

Another common example is around exercise. Many of us have tried exercise routines that became difficult or a chore. We then associate exercise as unpleasant and something to avoid. And yet gyms are full of people who get a high on it.

The key with making changes to diet and exercise is to make the process pleasurable. Otherwise, you’ll develop an aversion to it. The key challenge is moving past the initial inertia in getting your body moving again. Once you do, then it becomes pleasant. When you get into the zone, pleasurable. The it becomes much easier to establish it as a habit.

As most exercise and goal setting programs tell you, take it a step at a time. Grow into it.

I’ve been really enjoying the walking and notice I’ve gradually increased how far I go effortlessly. And the program has now upped the ante. They noted that exercising an hour a day and then sitting 10 hours will not help your health as much. We have to break up all that sitting. Key is adding routines, like a stretching program and a gentle resistance/ strength training routine. In other words, building a more well-rounded exercise routine.

This increases fitness further and helps with weight loss and health maintenance.
We’re in the last 1/3 of the course now…
David

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