Culturing Creative Genius

April 14, 2014 at 3:45 pm | Posted in Books, Psychology, Writing | Leave a comment

Here and there we see books and studies of the highly successful. Behaviours we can emulate to achieve success. A new book takes a little different tack. Daily Rituals: How Artists Work by Mason Curry examines the habits of 161 creative thinkers and artists, many well-known.

In this review by Sarah Green in the Harvard Business Review, she describes The Daily Routines of Geniuses. Some of them you’ll find in most success books too. But the creative angle brings out other nuances. She quotes the book: “A solid routine fosters a well-worn groove for one’s mental energies and helps stave off the tyranny of moods.”

The reviewer notes “I began to notice several common elements in the lives of the healthier geniuses…” They were:
A workspace with minimal distractions
A daily walk – some long
Accountability metrics
A clear dividing line between important work and busywork
A habit of stopping when they’re on a roll, not when they’re stuck
A supportive partner
Limited social lives

Not that I’m a famous genius but I can add a few points to the excellent article.

She mentions how email comes in constantly. I long ago set my email up to not check automatically but rather I check manually so I could process it in bursts, at a break.

For myself, taking a break when you’re stuck is a good idea. Then you can come back fresh. But you may need to work through ongoing resistance. I also don’t break when I’m on a roll because the best stuff can come out then. However, that can result in an odd eating schedule on occasion.

As for the partner, there does need to be life balance in there for an effective relationship. It helps if they’re flexible about the inspiration though. As for “limited social lives”, that would be a less healthy trait. A lot of creative work is done solo. I learned that a balanced life includes a social life and became more intentional about that. It’s all too easy to put a life aside if the muse is strong.

One thing she mentioned but didn’t highlight would be “catching the muse when it shows up”. I have post-it notes around the place and keep paper & pen with me to capture ideas when they show up. They tend not to create memory impressions so can be lost like waking from a dream if they’re not noted. While this isn’t directly part of a daily routine, it is an important ritual.

I also recommend Elizabeth Gilbert’s distinction between Being a genius and Having a genius. While we can manage our lifestyle around genius and culture it, genius itself is not something we control. It is a gift rather than a trait. We must be prepared for when the wind rises and the light shines. Then we can capture a little of our creative genius.
David

Years of Living Dangerously

April 13, 2014 at 7:34 pm | Posted in Economoney, Media, Science | Leave a comment

What does the Syrian war, destruction of Indonesian parks and Texas have in common?
The premiere of a new Showtime series, Years of Living Dangerously, unexpectedly on global warming.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brvhCnYvxQQ

Its 1 hour. And it’s a surprise.

The TED Controversy Continues

April 12, 2014 at 9:27 pm | Posted in Events, Internet, Media, Science | Leave a comment

A year ago, I summarised some of the events that had occurred as a result of 2 controversial talks at a TEDx event in England.

As the site Science Set Free illustrates, the controversy didn’t die off. (scroll down their page for the background) 251 PhDs and MDs have signed a petition that was recently delivered to TED, expanding on the original 16. There is also a change.org petition still underway. They held a public rebuttal, though it looks  more like a press conference for the petition.

This article also came out, with more details about the West Hollywood event they pulled the plug on, 2 weeks before it was due to go. As the event was largely intact, they decided to go ahead anyway but Livestream inexplicably pulled the plug on them too. TED seems the only explanation. That created a rather large price tag for the shows producer. Reimbursement or support seems dubious at this stage of the game but it’s disturbing the apparent lack of integrity on TED’s part. As Science Set Free notes, TED “has become the central hub of cutting edge social and scientific thought internationally“. That’s disturbing if they’re being driven by radical atheists. Ironically their behaviour reinforces Sheldrake’s points.

The other TEDx event I’m aware of that lost TED support also went ahead, with a little more warning. Hosted by a small university, their original line-up had only one speaker mentioning the word “consciousness” in their talk title but there was a human potential theme. Ironically, that speaker was Kilby-award winning physicist John Hagelin who had spoken at TEDxWomen a few months prior. That talk is still present in the TED channel. The theme of that event? Fact & Faith.

Amusingly, the university conference is now being presented on-line under the banner “Consciousness Talks“. They set up a web site for it and have been gradually posting videos from that event this year. I posted an article on one of them by Dr. Pam Peeke: Hacked by a Cupcake, on Food and Addiction. One that should be on TED. I look forward to others.
David

Heartbleed – what is it?

April 11, 2014 at 11:16 am | Posted in Economoney, Internet, Media, Online services, Security, Software, Web Apps | 6 Comments

When you log into a secure web site and get “https” and a lock symbol, what you transmit is secure, right? Maybe. About 2/3′s of the web uses OpenSSL and its recently been discovered it’s had a bug for about 2 years.

“Heartbleed has the potential to be one of the biggest, most widespread vulnerabilities in the history of the modern web.”

Security expert Bruce Schneier says “‘catastrophic’ is the right word. On the scale of 1 to 10, this is an 11.

While there is a fix and it’s unlikely this was discovered and exploited in the past, the issue now is with sites that don’t have decent maintenance and don’t get updated. Now that the bug is known, some old site you used once long ago may now be insecure. If you have the habit of using the same password all over or using your social media (Facebook, Twitter, etc) logins on other sites, you may have unwittingly shared your access all over. Including to sites that are now secure.

Changing your password on such old sites won’t help in the slightest, contrary to some of the advice floating around. It’s only a useful exercise if you know the site has updated. But you can on sites that are fixed. All the major ones apparently have but there are millions of servers out there.

And the trick is, even server admins may never know they’ve been hacked with this one.

This article explains: Heartbleed Nightmare

You can check a site you use here

This is a great reason not to use the same password on multiple sites and may be a great time to implement a password manager like LastPass, if you have not already.

Not only did Monday bring Heartbleed but there was a security update for WordPress on Tuesday and another for Jetpack on Wednesday. The second 2 are things bloggers should update now. The first you want to be sure your web host has. You really don’t want your ecommerce offerings to go nasty on you.
David

UPDATE – see comments for more links

Gravity Waves?

March 20, 2014 at 1:35 pm | Posted in Media, Science, Space | 1 Comment

Not sure what all the fuss is about in science circles these days? It’s the first direct proof of the inflationary model of the big bang. Here’s the idea explained – light evidence of gravity waves in a predicted pattern – and stronger than they expected.

The NY Times takes a crack at explaining it here. More detail, and how they kept it a secret, on Wired.

David

World History

March 17, 2014 at 9:16 pm | Posted in Economoney, History, Media, Software | Leave a comment

We’ve all learned something of world history in school, of the empires built up and fallen. But the degree of change over the years, largely though conflict and war, is far greater than the larger conquests. Many an area became organized then collapsed as an entity or was absorbed by a neighbour. Names changed many times. The World Wars brought distant governments dividing communities in non-historical ways, leading to many of the conflicts of more recent years, like Iraq, Eastern Europe and the Crimea.

“The study of history is a powerful antidote to contemporary arrogance.”
- Paul Johnson

Here’s a site with world maps, showing Europe and area around 1 CE (AD). Click up the list on the left to see it evolve. The Historical Maps link up top also has links to Middle East and World History.

If you’d prefer to see this animated, this video shows the evolving map from 1000 BC  – 1000 AD.

And this from 1000 AD to the present time. Evidently its the output from Centennia software but the dates are not properly synced to the maps. Comments also complain about some details in the maps. However, the point is the larger flow of territory and rulership. History is written by the conquerors.

“Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”
- George Santayana

I can also note that territory naming often does not represent what that country called itself. Japan, for example, does not call itself that. That’s not even an Anglicized version. Rude, or what?

“That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.”
- Aldous Huxley

It certainly gives perspective on claims of “historical lands” too. The new trend in searching ancestry via personal genetic testing reveals it’s not your land and my land but our land.
David

Decentralized Internet

March 15, 2014 at 11:15 pm | Posted in Computers, Economoney, Internet, Media, Software, Technology, Web Apps | Leave a comment

The technology landscape has been changing rapidly. Companies like Microsoft have already lost over half their market share. Meanwhile, the open Internet has devolved into a giant marketing opportunity. Dominant technology players are gathering everything they can about our movements, shopping, and social lives. Just look at what you have to approve on a typical smart phone app. Or how you’re invited to use one service to log into another. Government agencies have been doing the same and more, quite illegally.

Meanwhile, a variety of technologies have been developing to change the way we connect and interact – mainly to take out the intermediaries. The behaviour of business and government above and the revelations of security breaches and spying are simply pushing those technologies to the fore so we can take back control of our lives and devices.
Here is a talk by Fred Wilson in Paris, on 3 macro trends in society:

3 macro trends:
- from bureaucratic hierarchies to technology-driven networks (eg: newspaper to Twitter)
- unbundling – how products and services are delivered, specialization (eg: finance moving away from banks, a la carte entertainment on demand)
- becoming a network node (w/ smart phones, shifting from desktop), always on and connected

4 Sectors to watch:
- money – distributed and decentralized payments on the Internet, without the banks
- health & wellness – staying out of the health care system, wearable monitors
- data leakage – data pollution, spying
- identity – cryto-currency applied to online and secure identity

This article lists 21 technologies that may decentralize networks, including mesh networks, alternative domain registration, and decentralized farming. We live in remarkable times.
David

Running Android on a PC

March 13, 2014 at 8:52 pm | Posted in Backup, Computers, Economoney, Games, Hardware, Software, Technology | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , ,

Say you want to mess around with Android and apps, but you’re a little nervous about experimenting on that rather expensive phone or tablet. One solution is to load Android into a virtual environment where you can play around all you like and nothing is ever broken. All you do is back up your virtual machine (VM) software folder first, then if anything goes sideways you can restore it in about a minute. Developers use this approach all the time.

Oracle’s VirtualBox (VB) is free virtualization software you can install just about any Operating System (os) into (assuming you have a legal license). I’ve been running Windows XP, Ubuntu Linux and Android this way for several years. XP, mainly to support some old software that won’t run in current OS’s, the others to explore and experiment with. No messing with my main computer or setting up a boot loader. The other systems run in a window, so no rebooting required. File sharing is much like sharing over a network.

Fred Langa has written an article with step by step instructions for installing VirtualBox and Android on a PC. Most of the steps are pretty obvious but there are a few options that are not and a couple of gotchas. Note his comments about the captured mouse (for touch-screen behaviour), for example.

For Android, you need VT-x (AMD-V on an AMD processor) enabled in the PC’s BIOS. Most modern processors have it but it may be off by default. I checked a couple of utilities to confirm I had it but it was off anyway. Just reboot into your computers BIOS and turn it on. (instructions vary by maker) If you skip that step, the instructions will tell you Android is not supported, so do take care of that first.

I also noticed that some people who also use Microsoft Virtual Machines (like XP Mode) may find VT-x not working because Hyper-V is hogging it. In that case, it’s on in the BIOS but still unavailable in VB. In Windows 7+, the Hyper-V setting is hidden. Comment 5 on this thread offers the command line for turning it off and on. If you want to get fancier, I noticed this article on Hyper-V Manager. It still requires a reboot though.

Other Choices
If you just want to play an Android game on your PC, you might like Bluestacks. It’s designed for loading apps on a PC. It says it’s free only while in beta though.

Genymotion is an Android virtualization tool to create various OS version and screen size variations to test an app in. That’s for more advanced testing.

More OS’s
The advantage of using a tool like VirtualBox is you can also play around with other OS’s. You can get other images (VMs) here, for example. A popular Linux distro, Ubuntu is here. Install the current VB Extension Pack to support it.

The 13.04 version of Ubuntu is an OVA file. OVA files are preconfigured – just double-click to load into VirtualBox. Far fewer steps than in Fred’s article above. It also comes with LibreOffice and other software pre-installed. Note the password on the download page for your first Ubuntu login. You can go into System Settings (gear top right) and add a new User of your choice once logged in.

Rather than downloading a virtual machine, you can also install an OS directly yourself. Create the container in VB (New button), then install into that. This article reviews installing a distro from Ubuntu directly.

You can install a wide range of other OS’s, including Windows and Mac, in a virtual machine – it’s a great way to test and experiment without messing anything up. Or to run old software that won’t install in a modern OS.

Given the end of Windows XP’s support in April, it will soon no longer be safe for web surfing and other Internet uses but it may still have a role for old software in a virtual machine. Fred reviews installing XP into a virtual machine and the VM backup process here. (article free for subscribers) If you have an old XP install you’re retiring and want to move it to a virtual machine, you can use the free Disk2vhd. This is especially useful if your old computer didn’t come with system install disks. VHD is a Microsoft virtualization format but VirtualBox can use it.

And if you have some concern this is experimental technology or something, it’s been around for years. If you surf the web, you’ll have used a virtual machine. Many large web sites are run in virtual machines so they can, in moments, shift from one physical server to another when under load.
David

Promotion via Fakery

March 6, 2014 at 5:36 pm | Posted in Events, Hardware, Humor, Internet, Media, Science, Strange, Technology, Transportation | Leave a comment

A weird episode in Internet “marketing” this week. A real company, HUVr Tech, seeking funding  sought buzz. First, they faked up a Promo video for Hoverboards, complete with the famous and Back to the Future references. Note the 0 noise and that the video is named “belief” (on their web site). They apparently used the Back to the Future wire harness.

Second, an “apology” by Christopher Lloyd. He was tricked??   Then, one from Tony Hawk, the famed skateboarder. Wired comments.

Fake promotions and fake apologies? Lame. Pranks are funny only if you include the punchline. Has their home page been updated to reflect this? Nope. This is what they think of their possible customers?
David

First Nations and Vancouver

March 6, 2014 at 5:28 pm | Posted in History, Media | Leave a comment
Tags: , ,

The City of Vancouver has produced a Guide for newcomers to aid in establishing roots here. Along with that is an overview of local First Nations (PDF) as it’s often something an immigrant is interested in but not always readily accessible. It’s also a useful general summary of local First Nations for everyone.

As may be obvious from the maps, there is a great deal of overlap in traditional territories. Lands were not owned and thus not formerly defined by fixed boundaries. Rather, they were working territories that included seasonal uses. When finally the provincial government agreed to treaty negotiations, they began by working with individual nations. But until the overlaps had been negotiated and defined, it created an unfair process and problems with individual treaties. Not every nation was as far along in establishing self-government expertise to handle such an important representation. Instead, the nations needed to negotiate amongst themselves and bring that agreement to the provincial government to negotiate their own settlement. This required a common meeting ground as this Chiefs document (PDF) reviews.

We have a rich history, far beyond a one hundred year-old building or a European sailing ship.
David

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